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AAS Congruent Triangles
Read the Fine Print
Rating
3.66666666667 stars

An interactive applet and associated web page that shows how triangles that have two angles and a non-included side the same must be congruent. The applet shows two triangles, one of which can be reshaped by dragging any vertex. The other changes to remain congruent to it and the two angles and non-included side are outlined in bold to show they are the same measure and are the elements being used to prove congruence. The web page describes all this and has links to other related pages. Applet can be enlarged to full screen size for use with a classroom projector. This resource is a component of the Math Open Reference Interactive Geometry textbook project at http://www.mathopenref.com.

Subject:
Geometry
Material Type:
Reading
Simulation
Provider:
Math Open Reference
Author:
John Page
Date Added:
02/16/2011
Alpha Decay (AR)
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

Watch alpha particles escape from a polonium nucleus, causing radioactive alpha decay. See how random decay times relate to the half life.

Subject:
Physical Science
Material Type:
Simulation
Provider:
University of Colorado Boulder
Provider Set:
PhET Interactive Simulations
Author:
Carl Wieman
Danielle Harlow
John Blanco
Kathy Perkins
Noah Podolefsky
Ron LeMaster
Sam McKagan
Wendy Adams
Date Added:
09/02/2012
Application of Derivatives
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

We use the derivative to determine the maximum and minimum values of particular functions (e.g. cost, strength, amount of material used in a building, profit, loss, etc.).Differentiation is also used in analysis of finance and economics.

Subject:
Finance
Geometry
Material Type:
Simulation
Provider:
GeoGebra
Provider Set:
GeoGebraTube
Date Added:
03/12/2012
Balloons & Buoyancy (AR)
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

Experiment with a helium balloon, a hot air balloon, or a rigid sphere filled with different gases. Discover what makes some balloons float and others sink.

Subject:
Physics
Material Type:
Simulation
Provider:
University of Colorado Boulder
Provider Set:
PhET Interactive Simulations
Author:
Carl Wieman
Danielle Harlow
Kathy Perkins
Ron LeMaster
Date Added:
07/02/2009
The Broken Stick Experiment: Triangles, Random Numbers and Probability
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0,0 stars

This learning video is designed to develop critical thinking in students by encouraging them to work from basic principles to solve a puzzling mathematics problem that contains uncertainty. Materials for in-class activities include: a yard stick, a meter stick or a straight branch of a tree; a saw or equivalent to cut the stick; and a blackboard or equivalent. In this video lesson, during in-class sessions between video segments, students will learn among other things: 1) how to generate random numbers; 2) how to deal with probability; and 3) how to construct and draw portions of the X-Y plane that satisfy linear inequalities.

الموضوع:
القياس والبيانات
نوع المادة:
Lecture
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
أزهار معهد ماساتشوستس للتكنولوجيا MIT
المؤلف:
Richard C. Larson
Date Added:
10/31/2014
Conductivity (AR)
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

Experiment with conductivity in metals, plastics and photoconductors. See why metals conduct and plastics don't, and why some materials conduct only when you shine a flashlight on them.

Subject:
Physics
Material Type:
Simulation
Provider:
University of Colorado Boulder
Provider Set:
PhET Interactive Simulations
Author:
Carl Wieman
Kathy Perkins
Sam McKagan
Sam Reid
Wendy Adams
Date Added:
07/01/2004
Density (AR)
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

Why do objects like wood float in water? Does it depend on size? Create a custom object to explore the effects of mass and volume on density. Can you discover the relationship? Use the scale to measure the mass of an object, then hold the object under water to measure its volume. Can you identify all the mystery objects?

Subject:
Physics
Material Type:
Simulation
Provider:
University of Colorado Boulder
Provider Set:
PhET Interactive Simulations
Author:
Archie Paulson
Carl Wieman
Chris Malley
Jonathan Olson
Kathy Perkins
Kelly Lancaster
Noah Podolefsky
Patricia Loblein
Sam Reid
Wendy Adams
Date Added:
09/01/2010
Double Wells and Covalent Bonds
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

Explore tunneling splitting in double well potentials. This classic problem describes many physical systems, including covalent bonds, Josephson junctions, and two-state systems such as spin 1/2 particles and ammonia molecules.

Subject:
Physics
Material Type:
Simulation
Provider:
University of Colorado Boulder
Provider Set:
PhET Interactive Simulations
Author:
Carl Wieman
Chris Malley
Kathy Perkins
Sam McKagan
Date Added:
10/04/2006
Fabulous Fractals and Difference Equations
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0,0 stars

This learning video introduces students to the world of Fractal Geometry through the use of difference equations. As a prerequisite to this lesson, students would need two years of high school algebra (comfort with single variable equations) and motivation to learn basic complex arithmetic. Ms. Zager has included a complete introductory tutorial on complex arithmetic with homework assignments downloadable here. Also downloadable are some supplemental challenge problems. Time required to complete the core lesson is approximately one hour, and materials needed include a blackboard/whiteboard as well as space for students to work in small groups. During the in-class portions of this interactive lesson, students will brainstorm on the outcome of the chaos game and practice calculating trajectories of different equations.

الموضوع:
هندسة الشكل
نوع المادة:
Lecture
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
أزهار معهد ماساتشوستس للتكنولوجيا MIT
المؤلف:
Laura Zager
Date Added:
07/12/2014
Fabulous Fractals and Difference Equations
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0,0 stars

This learning video introduces students to the world of Fractal Geometry through the use of difference equations. As a prerequisite to this lesson, students would need two years of high school algebra (comfort with single variable equations) and motivation to learn basic complex arithmetic. Ms. Zager has included a complete introductory tutorial on complex arithmetic with homework assignments downloadable here. Also downloadable are some supplemental challenge problems. Time required to complete the core lesson is approximately one hour, and materials needed include a blackboard/whiteboard as well as space for students to work in small groups. During the in-class portions of this interactive lesson, students will brainstorm on the outcome of the chaos game and practice calculating trajectories of different equations.

الموضوع:
هندسة الشكل
نوع المادة:
Lecture
Provider:
MIT Learning International Networks Consortium
Provider Set:
M.I.T. Blossoms
المؤلف:
Laura Zager
Date Added:
06/02/2012
Friction (AR)
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

Learn how friction causes a material to heat up and melt. Rub two objects together and they heat up. When one reaches the melting temperature, particles break free as the material melts away. Arabic Language.

Subject:
Physics
Material Type:
Simulation
Provider:
University of Colorado Boulder
Provider Set:
PhET Interactive Simulations
Author:
Carl Wieman
Danielle Harlow
Michael Dubson
Mindy Gratny
Wendy Adams
Date Added:
06/02/2008
Gas Properties (AR)
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

Pump gas molecules to a box and see what happens as you change the volume, add or remove heat, change gravity, and more. Measure the temperature and pressure, and discover how the properties of the gas vary in relation to each other.

Subject:
Physics
Material Type:
Simulation
Provider:
University of Colorado Boulder
Provider Set:
PhET Interactive Simulations
Author:
Carl Wieman
Danielle Harlow
Jack Barbera
Kathy Perkins
Linda Koch
Michael Dubson
Ron LeMaster
Date Added:
07/02/2009
General Chemistry I
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

This survey chemistry course is designed to introduce students to the world of chemistry. In this course, we will study chemistry from the ground up, learning the basics of the atom and its behavior. We will apply this knowledge to understand the chemical properties of matter and the changes and reactions that take place in all types of matter. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: Define the general term 'chemistry.' Distinguish between the physical and chemical properties of matter. Distinguish between mixtures and pure substances. Describe the arrangement of the periodic table. Perform mathematical operations involving significant figures. Convert measurements into scientific notation. Explain the law of conservation of mass, the law of definite composition, and the law of multiple proportions. Summarize the essential points of Dalton's atomic theory. Define the term 'atom.' Describe electron configurations. Draw Lewis structures for molecules. Name ionic and covalent compounds using the rules for nomenclature of inorganic compounds. Explain the relationship between enthalpy change and a reaction's tendency to occur. (Chemistry 101; See also: Biology 105. Mechanical Engineering 004)

Subject:
Chemistry
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Textbook
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
11/16/2011
Guess the Last Ball
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

This video lesson uses the technique of induction to show students how to analyze a seemingly random occurrence in order to understand it through the development of a mathematical model. Using the medium of a simple game, Dr. Lodhi demonstrates how students can first apply the 'rules' to small examples of the game and then, through careful observation, can begin to see the emergence of a possible pattern. Students will learn that they can move from observing a pattern to proving that their observation is correct by the development of a mathematical model. Dr. Lodhi provides a second game for students in the Teacher Guide downloadable on this page. There are no prerequisites for this lesson and needed materials include only a blackboard and objects of two different varieties - such as plain and striped balls, apples and oranges, etc. The lesson can be completed in a 50-minute class period.

Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
MIT Learning International Networks Consortium
Provider Set:
M.I.T. Blossoms
Author:
Fakhar Lohdi
Date Added:
06/02/2012
Inquiry: Using an Egg Drop Activity to Promote Critical Thinking and Analysis Skills
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

In this hands-on inquiry activity, students will design and construct an apparatus that will permit an egg to survive a nine foot fall. Students are given limited materials, so they must critically think about the design and improvise strategies during the building of the apparatus

Subject:
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Science Education Resource Center (SERC) at Carleton College
Provider Set:
Pedagogy in Action
Author:
Seth Webster
Date Added:
12/09/2011
Interpreting Statistics: A Case of Muddying the Waters
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
Rating
0.0 stars

This lesson unit is intended to help teachers assess how well students are able to: interpret data and evaluate statistical summaries; and critique someone elseŐs interpretations of data and evaluations of statistical summaries. The lesson also introduces students to the dangers of misapplying simple statistics in real-world contexts, and illustrates some of the common abuses of statistics and charts found in the media.

Subject:
Statistics and Probability
Material Type:
Assessment
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Shell Center for Mathematical Education
Provider Set:
Mathematics Assessment Project (MAP)
Date Added:
04/26/2013
Is Bigger Better? A Look at a Selection Bias that Is All Around Us
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

This learning video addresses a particular problem of selection bias, a statistical bias in which there is an error in choosing the individuals or groups to make broader inferences. Rather than delve into this broad topic via formal statistics, we investigate how it may appear in our everyday lives, sometimes distorting our perceptions of people, places and events, unless we are careful. When people are picked at random from two groups of different sizes, most of those selected usually come from the bigger group. That means we will hear more about the experience of the bigger group than that of the smaller one. This isn't always a bad thing, but it isn't always a good thing either. Because big groups ''speak louder,'' we have to be careful when we write mathematical formulas about what happened in the two groups. We think about this issue in this video, with examples that involve theaters, buses, and lemons. The prerequisite for this video lesson is a familiarity with algebra. It will take about one hour to complete, and the only materials needed are a blackboard and chalk.

Subject:
Education
Mathematics
Sociology
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT Blossoms
Author:
Anna Teytelman
Arnold Barnett
MIT BLOSSOMS
Date Added:
06/02/2012